BOOK REVIEW: Day By Day Armageddon: Ghost Run

This review is long overdue, but better late than never.

 

51s0etzxtylIt was about two years ago when I first picked up a copy of Day by Day Armageddon by J.L. Bourne. Being a red-blooded American, I’ve always enjoyed zombie movies/games, but thanks to Max Brooks I became quite enthralled with zombie literature, as well. So, when I came across DBDA on sale, I thought I would give it a whirl. After all, the author is in the US armed forces, which already warrants a great deal of respect from me. I figured the worst that could happen was that I didn’t like it, and one of the men protecting this nation has a few extra bucks in his pocket. Suffice it to say, my socks were full and properly blown off with this series—I was hooked.

I’m considering doing another, lengthier review on books 1-3, but this review will be about book 4, subtitled Ghost Run. While this review will be best read by people who have gone through the previous books, I will do my best to avoid significant spoilers for someone who hasn’t read all (or some) of the prior books in the series.

Book 3 (Shattered Hourglass) deviates from the rest of the series and is written (mostly) in third person following several different people/groups. At first this was a bit difficult to chew, and I questioned why Bourne made that decision. However, by the end of the book I had seen a story—a much deeper story—develop. And while the move to third person was a bit jarring, it advanced the story in a way that would just not have been possible to do from the first person perspective of the main character. This is not to say the book was bad, just that it was different. But, I realized that it was a necessary choice for Bourne to make to take the plot the direction he did. And I am glad he did it, because it set up the story for Ghost Run—the best book of the series!

Ghost Run returns to the first person perspective of Kilroy (Kil), the protagonist, and starts off a short time after Shattered Hourglass ends. And it doesn’t take long for Kil to find himself out on the road, again, facing hordes of the undead who are hellbent on having him for dinner. Picking up a faint distress signal from a familiar group with significant news, Kil quickly decides to take on the suicidal task of locating and extracting the group located inside a major city. It’s worth the risk.

One of the first things I want point out about this book that I love is that Kil is alone. Sure, he interacts with a few people here and there (many of which don’t take too kindly to strangers), but in this book he is by himself more than he is in any of the other books. And, as I read through the book, I think I felt more anxious and empathetic for the hero than at any other point in the series (with perhaps the exception of a stretch of chapters in book 2). And even though Kil has a companion of sorts in Ghost Run, for all intents and purposes it’s him versus the world. And it’s great!

Another thing I really enjoyed about this book was getting to know Kil more on a personal level—on a more vulnerable level. In the interest of those who haven’t read the other books, I won’t go into details, but the concerns and worries that plague Kil’s thoughts at times, for the people he cares about, brought a new depth to his character in this book. One that I can personally relate to. I am quite sure these thoughts came straight from Bourne’s heart, and was not just an attempt to pull at the heart strings of the reader. I found it easy to laugh when Kil laughed, get choked up when Kil got choked up, and get frustrated for him when the crap kept piling on. In this book, Kil has to climb a mountain of struggles while slaying more demons than just the undead.

As if there was any question to it, Bourne delivers brilliantly on the intense action front. There are some chapters in the book that I found myself so tensed up that my fingers began to hurt from clutching my Kindle, and it would take me several minutes after powering down my e-reader to come out of the story and back to reality. For some readers, reaching this point comes a bit easier, but not so much for me. I can count on one hand the books that have impacted me that way, and Ghost Run, by far, did it the most.

J.L. Bourne, like myself, is a gun enthusiast. And, like me, inserts much of that enthusiasm into his writing. For me personally, I loved reading the details about weapons and supplies Kil came across over the course his journey. Some people might get a bit bogged down with this information if their knowledge of the subject is limited, but Bourne does a good job of keeping the story flowing even during these situations. And proper context is usually offered to explain the technical talk. However, I’m going to go out on a limb here, and assume most of his readers won’t have any problems in this department.

Ghost Run is written in a way that I feel someone who has not read any of the prior books in the series could pick this one up and read it standalone. There’s enough information given to explain characters and past situations that it wouldn’t leave you completely confused. Having said that, you will get so much more out of this book if you read the first three. So, do it.

I’d be lying if I said J.L. Bourne wasn’t one of my favorite (if not my favorite) author. His craft improves with each story told, and each one of those stories is even more compelling than the last. Without a shadow of a doubt, J.L. Bourne has gained me as a reader for life. I look forward to his next release, whatever and whenever it may be.

 

You can pick up Day by Day Armageddon: Ghost Run (along with the other DBDA books in the series) over at Amazon and other book retailers. You can also check out his standalone doomsday/prepper novel, Tomorrow War, which was my favorite novel of his until Ghost Run released.

You can also learn more about this author at his website http://jlbourne.com/

 

-AJ